Phoenix Dark-Knight

Is a female of the species
Lives in North East England
Is at times occasionally: angry, political, funny, self-deprecating, offensive, simple & introverted
Listens to too many genres of music to list; reads a lot of comics; spends a frankly incredible amount of time playing videogames.
(Is a super spy, but shhhhhhhhh!)

twitter.com/PhoenixDK:

    eddache:

    image

    image

    Here’s a TomSka sketch I co-wrote called “Sniper Pug” featuring guns, explosions and an adorable pug.

    I also have a cameo voice role as both terrorists at 0:42

    I caught this last week, had no idea you wrote it! :) Great stuff!
    — 6 hours ago with 460 notes
    "If you repeatedly criticize someone for liking something you don’t, they won’t stop liking it. They’ll stop liking you."
    (via aliwallacee)

    (Source: psych-facts, via wilwheaton)

    — 14 hours ago with 43933 notes
    leafsfeelings:

choptail:

*SLAMS REBLOG BUTTON*

HIT REBLOG SO GODDAMN FAST

    leafsfeelings:

    choptail:

    *SLAMS REBLOG BUTTON*

    HIT REBLOG SO GODDAMN FAST

    (Source: htkfr, via themarysue)

    — 1 day ago with 204563 notes

    smashsurvey:

    Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

    Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularlyhow do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

    Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

    (via wilwheaton)

    — 5 days ago with 33804 notes
    http://themarysue.tumblr.com/post/83023907738/smegolas-bluebirdsandink-was-anyone-else-a →

    smegolas:

    bluebirdsandink:

    Was anyone else a little bit disappointed that the kick ass Lady Counsel Member turned out to be Natasha? Still love Natasha, but for a few glorious seconds, it was awesome to see an older woman come out of nowhere to kick ass.

    Oh hell yes. For one…

    Yup. In the 30secs it tpok for the reveal I’dcalready invented headcannon for the character being a secret BAMF

    :D

    — 5 days ago with 11617 notes

    therealkatiewest:

    All these pictures were taken on the same day in the same room. Don’t let anyone judge you for your shit.

    • You be beautiful and ugly and coy and scary
    • you open your mouth and your legs wide and
    • you do your make up for you and
    • you cry about things you can’t control and
    • you wait 40 minutes for the best burgers in town and you eat it by yourself and
    • you group sext with all your exes and
    • you do you.

    Fuck everyone who says, “No! You can’t do that.” Because all those people are

    1. wrong.
    I’m forever in love with how Katie West makes me feel like I can take on the world :)
    — 6 days ago with 766 notes

    wilwheaton:

    Survey of /r/mensrights turns up pretty much exactly what you’d expect.

    White, male, 17-20 years-old, and disconnected from reality.

    — 1 week ago with 2574 notes
    Reblog if you dont shave your legs everyday.

    nerdgerhl:

    my-herbal-journey:

    I just want everyone to see how unrealistic some expectations are.

    I have never shaved my legs. 

    — 1 week ago with 119526 notes
    becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

atomic-glitter:

boneswolf:

norcumi:

ladiesplusjunk:

that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

Just beautiful.

want

Boob cups must be the most uncomfortable things on earth… What the hell are you supposed to do when one of your boobs slips out? Let’s say you inhale or move your chest somehow so your breasts get free from the cup and end up clipped on the edge?? You can’t even pull them like you can when your bra gets all screwed up! Like who wants to wear that while they’re fighting monsters and shit?

I hit reblog so hard I may have sprained my finger

    becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

    atomic-glitter:

    boneswolf:

    norcumi:

    ladiesplusjunk:

    that’s how you make armor for women, no bullshit boob cups.

    Just beautiful.

    want

    Boob cups must be the most uncomfortable things on earth… What the hell are you supposed to do when one of your boobs slips out? Let’s say you inhale or move your chest somehow so your breasts get free from the cup and end up clipped on the edge?? You can’t even pull them like you can when your bra gets all screwed up! Like who wants to wear that while they’re fighting monsters and shit?

    I hit reblog so hard I may have sprained my finger

    (Source: crazybitcharoundhere, via themarysue)

    — 1 week ago with 92549 notes

    incognitomoustache:

    saintbucky:

    Anthony Mackie being the first black superhero (and making Bill O’Reilly uncomfortable) on Jimmy Fallon (x)

    I am so happy that Anthony Mackie is a person that exists.

    For anyone who’s going: “But what about Storm/Hancock/Frozone/War Machine etc etc?”: they’re referring to the fact that the character Falcon was the first African-American superhero* created (debuted in Captain America #177 in 1969). If you’ve watched the clip, you’ll notice that Mackie corrects Jimmy Fallon when he says first black superhero. This is because the first black superhero was Black Panther - debuted in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 - whom lives in the fictive African country Wakanda, and is thus not a citizen of the USA.

    (* = the word “superhero” is usually not used for hero characters that pre-date Superman, nor actually very often used outside the mainstream comic book companies aka DC Comics and Marvel Comics. This is why such characters as The Phantom, created in 1936 aka 2 years before Superman, and whom wears spandex and a mask and punches evil guys in the face, is not generally dubbed a super hero. Anyway, the point of this asterisk is that I have no idea how many fictional, non-“super” hero characters there were of African decent before 1966)

    (via mckelvie)

    — 2 weeks ago with 42065 notes
    nightguardmod:

princessmarshmallow:

ladyzolstice:

glorious-pc-gaming-master-race:

so how about a black Steve Rogers?



As amazing as this would be, it just historically would not have happened.
The 1940’s were pretty dang racist. The government wouldn’t have picked an African American man as their ultimate American soldier.

I’m gonna have to disagree with you on this one, Momi. In the 30s, we did send a super powered black man to Germany to fight the Nazis.
And he won.
His name: Jesse Owens.




1. Read more Marvel - there was a precursor to Captain America who was black and had the super solider serum. His name was  Isaiah Bradleyand his grandson is the Young Avenger Eli Bradley who (eventually) got a blood transfusion and his powers.



2. Read more history. There’s a lot that mainstream popular culture just won’t tell you about the hidden heroes, from female warriors right up to modern day soldiers who aren’t officially recognised by the “history books” so to speak.

:)

    nightguardmod:

    princessmarshmallow:

    ladyzolstice:

    glorious-pc-gaming-master-race:

    so how about a black Steve Rogers?

    As amazing as this would be, it just historically would not have happened.

    The 1940’s were pretty dang racist. The government wouldn’t have picked an African American man as their ultimate American soldier.

    I’m gonna have to disagree with you on this one, Momi. In the 30s, we did send a super powered black man to Germany to fight the Nazis.

    And he won.

    His name: Jesse Owens.

    1. Read more Marvel - there was a precursor to Captain America who was black and had the super solider serum. His name was Isaiah Bradleyand his grandson is the Young Avenger Eli Bradley who (eventually) got a blood transfusion and his powers.

    2. Read more history. There’s a lot that mainstream popular culture just won’t tell you about the hidden heroes, from female warriors right up to modern day soldiers who aren’t officially recognised by the “history books” so to speak. :)

    (via brainedbysaucepans)

    — 2 weeks ago with 401 notes